Author: The Offending Adam

Testing, Testing: Welcome to the TOA Podcast

Testing, Testing: Welcome to the TOA Podcast


Avni VyasWelcome to Episode Zero of the TOA podcast, where we invite readers to eavesdrop and interlope on conversations among The Offending Adam’s editors and the authors we publish! In this episode, our host Avni Vyas (“pictured”) talks with fellow TOA editor and podcast-editor-in-training Nik De Dominic for a kind of podcasting sound check. Future episodes will feature authors reading their work and talking with our editors about poetry and the creative process. But today we’re testing the mic with a chat about brilliant farts, neon f**ks, poems, and life. Thanks for listening, and please excuse our rough edges.

Vi Khi Nao on Working with the Universe

Vi Khi Nao on Working with the Universe


Vi Khi NaoThe poet Vi Khi Nao joins TOA editors Avni Vyas and Andrew Wessels for a talk about simile as emotional-cargo transport, poems that arrive within five minutes, sandy mussels, and the dangers of reading sapphic writings in front of small children. Plus: Nao reads excerpts from her new TOA chapbook, “Every Dress Is a Simile.”

Vi Khi Nao is the author of four poetry collections—“Human Tetris” (11:11 Press, 2019) “Sheep Machine” (Black Sun Lit, 2018), “Umbilical Hospital” (1913 Press, 2017), “The Old Philosopher” (winner of the Nightboat Prize for 2014)—and of the short-story collection “A Brief Alphabet of Torture” (winner of the 2016 FC2 Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Prize) and the novel “Fish in Exile” (Coffee House Press, 2016). Her work includes poetry, fiction, film, and cross-genre collaboration. She was the Fall 2019 fellow at the Black Mountain Institute and her website is https://www.vikhinao.com.

A Moment of Rest

Maybe the best place to begin a review of our 2012 publications is with our recently announced Pushcart Prize nominees Amaranth Borsuk, Heather Christle, Louise Mathias, Oliver de la Paz, David Dodd Lee, and Eryn Green.

We published a number of special issues throughout the year, with portfolios focusing on recent chapbook publications, on calamitous poetry, on the intersection of politics and poetry, and the surprising and engaging possibilities of progressive translation.

Spring brought the publication of the third installment of our Chapvelope Series. This edition featured Fiona Sze-Lorrain’s translations from the Chinese of Lan Lan and Yi Lu, a series of flashcard-broadsides from Heather Christle, and a postcard-broadside from Polly Duff Bresnick.

Fall brought the launch of a new book review series featuring a rotation of poets as reviewer-of-the-month, covering a book of their choosing each week of their tenure. Kelli Anne Noftle kissing George Trakl through Christian Hawkey’s Ventrakl. Tory Adkisson getting filthy with Ed Madden’s Prodigal: Variations. Randall Horton sequestered the multiple layers of Christopher Stackhouse’s Plural. And Molly Brodak so generously provided our holidays with two books and a tuxedo fudge recipe.

And then there were all the issues that delighted, surprised, and challenged us: Rusty Morrison & John Gallaher, Tom Raworth, Bradley Harrison, Michelle Taransky, Lily Brown, Cynthia Arrieu-King, Gale Nelson, Elena Karina Byrne, Joshua Kryah, Robert Andrew Perez, and Daniel Tiffany.

This is, of course, just a haphazard overview of some of the work we were lucky enough to curate during the year. Many more delightful issues filled with new writing are always ready for new readers and for old readers to rediscover.

We hope you have a safe and happy holidays and new year. We will see you in 2013.

2012 Pushcart Prize Nominees

Amaranth Borsuk:: Five Simple Machines

The hand that had its work cut out for it was cut out
for its work. Knuckling down on the desk, it curled
to a tool not there, scissors that might replace pen
with loop and lever, flexed: machinely precision—
potential at rest…read the rest here

Heather Christle:: The Seaside!

This is a wall of great intensity and furious
it kind of hums yellow and hums
green and never shall it hum purple Captain
when will you relieve me The wall
I love at night is huge and warms me
like a caterpillar or bag but do I also
have a family Captain or is the wall
the only shelter I have known and furious…read the rest here

Louise Mathias:: Silt

Yes, it was a kind of terror. As if fingering
the spine of a book, then finding
every page is gone. In this admission,
children can go missing…read the rest here

Oliver de la Paz:: Labyrinth 58

The boy in the labyrinth presses his palm against his chest. His heart sifts through the
morning’s weight. The life promised resides somewhere in the hungry marrow. The
promised life becomes something else…read the rest here

David Dodd Lee:: “The Soul as a Skiff”

That was where I learned

my guardian angel is a liar. She called me Little Saint. She struck me
in the head with a wand made out of shallow ponds: first

I saw her feet naked, her legs, her wings folded. She said, My
breasts are not two fountains…read the rest here

Eryn Green:: Dear Beings, I Can Feel Your Hands

I can’t just go out and buy a wheat-colored soul

write a sadder poem—startled

by windows curved up in the shape of

fins. Up and behind my head

the shadows on the table spin

for us. We are in love—if I could

spend my life beneath palm fronds…read the rest here

Chapvelope Three Launches

The Chapvelope Series is currently sold out.

               

Chapvelope Three

Chapvelope Three, our translation Chapvelope, is now available, featuring a hand-bound chapbook (27# text, 65# cover, linen binding), a series of eight hand-cut flashcard broadsides (67# cardstock), and a postcard broadside. Each element draws attention to the translatability and transmutability of language through the combination of content and form. The offerings range from translations of contemporary Chinese poets to selections from an eye-rhyme translation of Homer’s Odyssey, to a material re-visioning of everyday English words and objects. We hope that readers will enjoy a new experience with language upon reading and a lasting delight in the unique artifact that is the Chapvelope, which includes the following:

Lan Lan & Yi Lu:: You Are Not Here & Volcanic Stone

               translated by Fiona Sze-Lorrain

Heather Christle:: Some Ideograms

Polly Duff Bresnick:: from Old Gus Eats

Chapvelope Three Launches

The Chapvelope Series is currently sold out.               

Chapvelope Three

Chapvelope Three, our translation Chapvelope, is now available, featuring a hand-bound chapbook (27# text, 65# cover, linen binding), a series of eight hand-cut flashcard broadsides (67# cardstock), and a postcard broadside. Each element draws attention to the translatability and transmutability of language through the combination of content and form. The offerings range from translations of contemporary Chinese poets to selections from an eye-rhyme translation of Homer’s Odyssey, to a material re-visioning of everyday English words and objects. We hope that readers will enjoy a new experience with language upon reading and a lasting delight in the unique artifact that is the Chapvelope, which includes the following:

Lan Lan & Yi Lu:: You Are Not Here & Volcanic Stone

               translated by Fiona Sze-Lorrain

Heather Christle:: Some Ideograms

Polly Duff Bresnick:: from Old Gus Eats

Get your envelope of goodies for only $12 (S&H included).

A Moment of Rest

A good place to begin perusing our 2011 publications is with our recently announced Pushcart Prize nominees Jaswinder Bolina, Randall Horton, Amorak Huey, Lauren Ireland, Keetje Kuipers, and Johnathon Williams.

During the year, we published a number of special issues. Our First Anniversary Issue celebrated the beginning of our 2011 publication schedule. Word & Image investigated ekphrasis and the relationship verbal and visual representation. The Tuscaloosa Issue presented writing on Tuscaloosa in order to call attention to the vital need for aid and support after tornadoes devastated the city and the region. Four Contemporary Chamoru Poets, guest edited by Craig Santos Perez, presented the wide range of Chamoro experience, aesthetics, and cultural identity.

Some issues brought translations from the Chinese of Yang Zi, collaborative work by Sara Maclay and Holaday Mason, and essays on Tao Lin by Jennifer Moore and on memorability by Mark Irwin.

Spring brought with it the second installment in our Chapvelope series of publications. Selections from Chapvelope Two by Gillian Conoley and Joshua Marie Wilkinson were also published in the journal.

And then there were a number of contributions that delighted, surprised, and challenged us: Rebecca Lindenberg, MC Hyland, H.L. Hix, Mark Irwin, Sean Thomas Dougherty, Erin Martin, Shamala Gallagher, Charlotte Pence, Jeff Downey, Liam O’Brien, Frank Giampetro, and Saba Razvi.

This is, of course, just a haphazard overview of some of the work we were lucky enough to curate during the year. Many more delightful issues filled with content are always ready for new readers and for old readers to rediscover.

2011 Pushcart Prize Nominees

Jaswinder Bolina:: Aviary

do you remember the time we didn’t go to Topeka
we were ready to go with our sandwiches packed
and you had your harpoon and I had my headdress
but we didn’t go though we agreed it totally boffo
we could go to Topeka whenever we liked
but I said I’d rather live here than Topeka where
all they have is a crummy zoo and whoever
heard of Topeka anyway so we didn’t go
and spent the day instead alphabetizing
the pantry quipping how this had become going
to Topeka

Randall Horton:: The Weight of All Things

once there were particles, atoms clung
together & glue

there were noises from the bang

another universe begun, life
& the body formed, a shape

obtuse the head splendid. o human.
o being…

Amorak Huey:: A Death at Pictured Rocks

They arrested the husband, who said he turned his back
for only as long as a man’s urine takes to hiss steamslicing
                                           through concise spring air
                                                    to the ground
at his feet and when he turned back around to face the view
he saw only his wife’s sandal and immediately passed out.
Waking, he crawled to the edge of the cliff — saw
something white below — passed out again.
                                           This was his first story…

Lauren Ireland:: Sorry It’s So Small

Remember how you went away.        Now Nature hates you.
Well    I want to die    but just a little bit    every day.
I have learned    that everyone has some    great sadness.
I will let anyone    do anything    to me…

Keetje Kuipers:: Dolores Park

In the flattening California dusk,
women gather under palms with their bags

of bottles and cans. The grass is feathered
with the trash of the day, paper napkins

blowing across the legs of those who still
drown on a patchwork of blankets…

Johnathon Williams:: Anniversary Sonnet

We fought all night, all morning, so I treat
myself to breakfast down at Common Grounds,
a Fayetteville thing to do. A regular pounds
the dregs of a Bloody Mary, and the heat
at 10 is already too much. It’s all
too much: the water bill, my promises,
her steady, undefeatable love…

A Summer Holiday

The Year 2011 (So Far…)

Our year began with a very special First Anniversary Issue featuring commissioned work from some of our favorite contributors from 2011: Mark Yakich, Craig Santos Perez, Kelli Anne Noftle, and Dan Beachy-Quick.

The year also featured our first translation contribution, from the Chinese poet Yang Zi translated by Ye Chun, Melissa Tuckey, and Fiona Sze-Lorrain.

The spring also saw the release of Chapvelope Two, featuring work by Gillian Conoley, Emily Motzkus, Joshua Marie Wilkinson, and Halsey Chait. Selections from Gillian Conoley and Joshua Marie Wilkinson also could be found in issues dedicated to each of their writing.

And then there were all the other delightful, challenging, and rewarding contributions that peopled each week’s issue, including work by Marthe Reed, Cassandra Smith, Rebecca Lindenberg, Keetje Kuipers, Mark Irwin, Randall Horton, and Saba Razvi among many other contributions.

The above is a haphazard overview of what we have done so far this year. We hope that you enjoy the above and have enjoyed this year so far (as well as some highlights from our 2010 contributions). We will see you again Monday, August 1 with new writing from Shamala Gallagher, and an interview with and essay from Mark Irwin.

A Moment of Rest

Our Year of 2010

A good place to start a review of our publications in 2010 is our Pushcart Prize nominees and our Best of the Web nominees.

Over the course of the year, we published a series of special issues: Launch Week, Prose & Poem, and Claim & Reclaim.

We also sought out longer works, publishing chapbook-length selections from Andrew K. Peterson, John Gallaher, Geoffrey G. O’Brien, and Dot Devota.

Some notable contributions were produced in collaboration, including work from Christopher Schaberg & Mark Yakich, Molly Bendall & John O’Brien, William Stobb & Cara Kluver & Zach Johnson, and Jon Cotner & Andy Fitch.

And then there were a number of contributions that delighted, surprised, and challenged us: Sasha Steensen, Bob Hicok, Alex Lemon, Andrew Zawacki, Joshua Harmon, Pat Nolan, Natalie Lyalin, David Welch, Julie Doxsee, Paul Legault, Ashley David, Thom Donovan, Matvei Yankelevich, Kendra Malone, Ever Saskya, Zach Savich, and Kate Greenstreet.

The above is a haphazard overview of some of the work we were lucky enough to curate through 2010. Many more delightful pieces of new writing, essays, reviews, and features are always ready for new readers.