Author: The Offending Adam

Katie Jean Shinkle on the Trailer Park of Her Mind

Katie Jean Shinkle on the Trailer Park of Her Mind


Katie Jean Shinkle

Katie Jean Shinkle joins Avni Vyas and Nik De Dominic to talk about Shinkle’s new TOA chapbook, “Will You Kiss Me Goodnight?” Strap in for a conversation that ranges from River Phoenix and the nineties to the identities we try on as teenagers. Plus: Shinkle talks about writing two new books in the span of a year.

Katie Jean Shinkle is the author of four novellas and six chapbooks, most recently “None of This is an Invitation” (with Jessica Alexander, Astrophil Press, forthcoming) and “Will You Kiss Me Goodnight?” (The Offending Adam, 2021). Recent work has been featured in Fugue, Sou’wester, Always Crashing, NELLE, Denver Quarterly, and elsewhere. She is a 2021 Lambda poetry fellow, co-poetry editor of DIAGRAM, and teaches in the M.F.A. in Creative Writing, Editing, and Publishing program at Sam Houston State University.

Avni Vyas on Finding Moments of Resistance on the Page

Avni Vyas on Finding Moments of Resistance on the Page


Avni Vyas

Avni Vyas joins Nik De Dominic and Whitney Holmes to talk about erasure as language finding its friends on the page; about bling, neon, and glitter; and about the synergistic influence of being surrounded by good company with an addiction to making. Plus, Vyas reads excerpts from her new TOA chapbook, “Far from Glorious Feeling.”

Avni Vyas (she/her) is the author of “Little God” (Burrow Press 2021), “Far from Glorious Feeling” (The Offending Adam, 2021), and co-author of “Candy in Our Brains” (CutBank 2014). She serves as the Essays editor for Honey Literary and poetry editor at The Offending Adam. Her work has been published in journals such as Meridian, Grist, Conjunctions, Third Coast, Juked, and others. She teaches in the Writing Program at New College of Florida. You can visit her on Instagram(@singstooloud) and Twitter (@AvniDangerfield).

Márton Simon and Timea Sipos on Finding the Familiar in Another Language

Márton Simon and Timea Sipos on Finding the Familiar in Another Language


Marton Timon

Timea Sipos

The Hungarian poet Márton Simon and the translator Timea Sipos join the TOA editors Avni Vyas and Ryan Winet to talk about the Magyar language, the everyday practice of freedom, and the uncatchable early-morning hours of nothingness. (And cats.) Plus: Simon and Sipos read excerpts from their new TOA chapbook, “Songs for 3:45 AM,” in English and Hungarian.

Márton Simon is a Hungarian poet, spoken word performer, and translator. He is the recipient of the 2010 Makói Medáliák Prize for the best debut poetry collection of the year, the 2017 Literary Scholarship of the Visegrad Foundation, and the 2018 Péter Horváth Literary Prize for his latest book. He has published three collections of poems: “Songs for 3:45 AM” in 2010, “Polaroids” in 2013, and “Fox Wedding” in 2018. He has translated poems by Ocean Vuong and Dean Young from the English, and poems by Ryuichi Tamura and Shuntaro Tanikawa from the Japanese. He has lived in Wales and Poland. He currently lives and works in Budapest, Hungary.

Timea Sipos is a Hungarian American translator, writer, and poet with an M.F.A. in Creative Writing from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Her translation of Kinga Tóth’s bilingual, multimedia poetry collection, “Írmag/Offspring,” appeared in 2020 with YAMA Art. Her writing appears in Prairie Schooner, Passages North, Juked, The Bisexual Poetry Anthology, and the Hungarian Kulter and Litera, among others. Other translations can be found in The Washington Square Review, The Offing, Asymptote, Two Lines, and elsewhere. She is a proud 2021-2022 Steinbeck Fellow, a 2021 Pushcart Prize nominee, a PEN/Robert J. Dau Prize nominee, a Miami Book Fair Emerging Writers Fellowship Honorable Mention, a J.F. Powers Prize for Short Fiction finalist, and a Cecelia Joyce Johnson Award finalist. Her work has received support from the MacDowell Colony, the Vermont Studio Center, Tin House, the American Literary Translators Association, the Hungarian Translators’ House, the Nevada Arts Council, and the Black Mountain Institute, among others.

Christine Gosnay on the Carnival of Speculation in Her Mind

Christine Gosnay on the Carnival of Speculation in Her Mind


Christine Gosnay

The author Christine Gosnay joins the TOA editors Avni Vyas and Nik De Dominic to talk about the sensuality of particle physics, private mythologies, Robert Lowell, and learning you’ve been pronouncing a word wrong for years. Plus: Gosnay reads excerpts from her shimmering new TOA chapbook, “The Double Slit Experiment.”

Christine Gosnay’s first book, “Even Years” (Kent State University Press, 2017), won the Stan and Tom Wick Poetry Prize. Her work has appeared recently in Best American Poetry 2020, Poetry, Image Journal, AGNI, The Missouri Review, The Poetry Review, Ecotone, and Bennington Review, and has featured on Poetry Daily and Verse Daily. Her chapbook, “The Wanderer,” is the 2019 title in Beloit Poetry Journal’s Chad Walsh Chapbook series. She lives in the Santa Cruz Mountains in California. Her website is thewritechristine.com.

Editors Roundtable: Poetry as Team Sport

Editors Roundtable: Poetry as Team Sport


S. Whitney Holmes

In this Editors Roundtable, the TOA editors gather to contemplate a question from fellow editor Whitney Holmes. Whit asks the group why and how we make TOA, which is entirely volunteer-run, and how it fits alongside our day jobs. We also learn why Avni’s not a lawyer, how bad at basketball Ryan is, and why poets make good copy editors.

 

Ava Hofmann on Not Taking Herself Too Seriously

Ava Hofmann on Not Taking Herself Too Seriously


Ava Hofmann

The poet Ava Hofmann joins Avni Vyas and Whitney Holmes to talk about humor as critical analysis, off-brand misuses for Microsoft Word, and the freedom of pretending that your art is bad—or even evil. Plus: Hofmann reads excerpts from her new TOA chapbook “MY MY SUMMER OF TOTAL FFAILURE,” a collection of visual poems that blend three-panel comic strips with public-domain imagery and nonlinear writings.

Originally from Oxford, Ohio, Ava Hofmann is a trans writer living and working in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Her work is focused on the intersection of visual writing, Marxism, and queer/trans identity. Her digital chapbook “THE WOMAN FACTORY” was published by the Operating System in 2020. Her first full-length book, “[…],” is forthcoming in 2021. She also “edits” SPORAZINE, a magazine of experimental writing written by trans people.

Jessica Q. Stark on Fraught Love Affairs with the Internet

Jessica Q. Stark on Fraught Love Affairs with the Internet


Jessica Q. Stark

The writer Jessica Q. Stark joins Nik De Dominic and Avni Vyas to talk about the Internet—as randomized chaos, as AOL CD-ROMs, as meme culture, as racism and misogyny, as addiction, as archive, as problematic yet loving relationship. Plus: Stark reads excerpts from her new long-scrolling, hyperlinked TOA chapbook, “INNANET: Love Poem for the Internet.”

Jessica Q. Stark is a poet and educator living in Jacksonville, Florida. Her first full-length poetry collection, “Savage Pageant,” was published by Birds, LLC, in March 2020 and was named one of the best poetry books of 2020 by the Boston Globe and Hyperallergic. She is the author of three poetry chapbooks and her poems and/or illustrations have appeared most recently in PleiadesPoetry DailyVerseCarolina QuarterlywildnessUp the Staircase QuarterlyHobart PulpTupelo QuarterlyGlass Poetry Journal, and others. She is an assistant poetry editor for AGNI and the comics editor for Honey Literary. She teaches writing at the University of North Florida.

Testing, Testing: Welcome to the TOA Podcast

Testing, Testing: Welcome to the TOA Podcast


Avni VyasWelcome to Episode Zero of the TOA podcast, where we invite readers to eavesdrop and interlope on conversations among The Offending Adam’s editors and the authors we publish! In this episode, our host Avni Vyas (“pictured”) talks with fellow TOA editor and podcast-editor-in-training Nik De Dominic for a kind of podcasting sound check. Future episodes will feature authors reading their work and talking with our editors about poetry and the creative process. But today we’re testing the mic with a chat about brilliant farts, neon f**ks, poems, and life. Thanks for listening, and please excuse our rough edges.

Vi Khi Nao on Working with the Universe

Vi Khi Nao on Working with the Universe


Vi Khi NaoThe poet Vi Khi Nao joins TOA editors Avni Vyas and Andrew Wessels for a talk about simile as emotional-cargo transport, poems that arrive within five minutes, sandy mussels, and the dangers of reading sapphic writings in front of small children. Plus: Nao reads excerpts from her new TOA chapbook, “Every Dress Is a Simile.”

Vi Khi Nao is the author of four poetry collections—“Human Tetris” (11:11 Press, 2019) “Sheep Machine” (Black Sun Lit, 2018), “Umbilical Hospital” (1913 Press, 2017), “The Old Philosopher” (winner of the Nightboat Prize for 2014)—and of the short-story collection “A Brief Alphabet of Torture” (winner of the 2016 FC2 Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Prize) and the novel “Fish in Exile” (Coffee House Press, 2016). Her work includes poetry, fiction, film, and cross-genre collaboration. She was the Fall 2019 fellow at the Black Mountain Institute and her website is https://www.vikhinao.com.

A Moment of Rest

Maybe the best place to begin a review of our 2012 publications is with our recently announced Pushcart Prize nominees Amaranth Borsuk, Heather Christle, Louise Mathias, Oliver de la Paz, David Dodd Lee, and Eryn Green.

We published a number of special issues throughout the year, with portfolios focusing on recent chapbook publications, on calamitous poetry, on the intersection of politics and poetry, and the surprising and engaging possibilities of progressive translation.

Spring brought the publication of the third installment of our Chapvelope Series. This edition featured Fiona Sze-Lorrain’s translations from the Chinese of Lan Lan and Yi Lu, a series of flashcard-broadsides from Heather Christle, and a postcard-broadside from Polly Duff Bresnick.

Fall brought the launch of a new book review series featuring a rotation of poets as reviewer-of-the-month, covering a book of their choosing each week of their tenure. Kelli Anne Noftle kissing George Trakl through Christian Hawkey’s Ventrakl. Tory Adkisson getting filthy with Ed Madden’s Prodigal: Variations. Randall Horton sequestered the multiple layers of Christopher Stackhouse’s Plural. And Molly Brodak so generously provided our holidays with two books and a tuxedo fudge recipe.

And then there were all the issues that delighted, surprised, and challenged us: Rusty Morrison & John Gallaher, Tom Raworth, Bradley Harrison, Michelle Taransky, Lily Brown, Cynthia Arrieu-King, Gale Nelson, Elena Karina Byrne, Joshua Kryah, Robert Andrew Perez, and Daniel Tiffany.

This is, of course, just a haphazard overview of some of the work we were lucky enough to curate during the year. Many more delightful issues filled with new writing are always ready for new readers and for old readers to rediscover.

We hope you have a safe and happy holidays and new year. We will see you in 2013.